THE FRANKLIN METHOD®

The Franklin Method® uses Dynamic Neurocognitive Imagery, anatomical embodiment and educational skills to create lasting positive change in your body and mind. The Method was founded by Eric Franklin in 1994 and is taught all over the world.

The Franklin Method® is at the forefront of practical neuro-plasticity; showing you how to use your brain to improve your body’s function.  It teaches you how to harness the transforming power of the mind, and can be applied to improve all of your abilities.  It all starts with the knowledge that we have the power to change.

The Franklin Method® teaches dynamic alignment and how to move your body with maximum efficiency to keep yourself youthful and energized.  In a sense, your posture is constantly being reinvented – in every moment, the ideal combination of limbs, joints, gravity, moving parts, connective tissue, and muscle must be found and directed by your brain and nervous system.

The Franklin Method® is recognized by health providers in Switzerland and is a regularly seen at dance, Pilates, yoga and physiotherapy conferences.

More about Dynamic Neurocognitive Imagery (DNI)™

Dynamic Neurocognitive Imagery (DNI) combines knowledge and research from a variety of fields, including anatomy, kinesiology, biomechanics, and neuroscience.  The DNI research team is constantly working on investigating various aspects of the beneficial effects of DNI on human motor performance, This team is composed of specialists in the fields of imagery, biomechanics, and motor performance.

 

Eric Franklin is the founder of the Franklin Method, and the director of the Franklin Method Institute in Wetzikon, Switzerland.  He has more than 35 years’ experience as a dancer, author and movement educator, and continues to teach extensively throughout the world.  Eric is a guest faculty member at the University of Vienna and at the Julliard School in New York.  He has provided training to Olympic and world champion athletes and is the author of over 20 books on human movement and the use of imagery.  Eric is a regular presenter at physiotherapy, dance, Pilates and yoga conferences.

Read these quotes from some of Eric Franklin’s books to help you understand more about this amazing work:

“In the Franklin Method, we use imagery as our primary tool to facilitate positive change.  By using imagery, you work directly with the nervous system, which has scientifically been proven to be the fastest route to change the way we use our bodies.  Mindful awareness is the first step in learning to use imagery.”

Happy Feet, Dynamic base, Effortless Posture; Eric Franklin; Copyright ®2010; page 1

“Behind every unhealthy physical movement pattern slumbers a good one.  But instead of getting tense by trying to change the bad, we delve into the body to bring the good back to the surface.  Imagery… encourages the body to rediscover dormant natural movement patterns…poor functioning is merely a temporary dominance of inefficient coordination; in the background there is a better movement pattern waiting to be resurrected.”

Relax your Neck Liberate your Shoulders; Eric Franklin; Copyright ®2000 and 2002; page xii

“Good posture is flexible and free.  If posture training is based on forcing oneself into a certain position, then this artificial posture will remain only as long as effort is used to keep it up… A posture which doesn’t allow itself to be translated into quality of movement is merely a superficial holding pattern…

“As soon as you have tightened up in any way for the sake of an improved posture – lifting the thorax and pulling in the belly – you have made movement more difficult.  Moving requires contraction of the muscles.  If the muscles are already contracted to maintain a certain posture, you will not be able to move very well.”

Inner Focus, Outer Strength; Eric Franklin; Copyright ®1998, 2006; page 43

 More information and videos about the Franklin Method can be found at:

http://www.franklinmethod.com

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Franklin Method® is a registered trademark

All illustrations ©Eric Franklin

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